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Publications

For information on the Waterfront Regeneration Trust's Mapbooks, click here.

 

Books available in pdf:

Design, Signage and Maintenance Guidelines: Waterfront Trail 2007 Update 

Victor Ford Associates Inc. (1997), Update by Marshall Macklin Monaghan (2007)

Stretching over 900 km along the Canadian shores of Lake Ontario and the Ontario Shores of the St. Lawrence River, the Waterfront Trail and Greenway is a major multi-use trail that connects parks, natural areas and centers of activity. The Design, Signage and Maintenance Guidelines were developed to assist in constructing and signing new Waterfront Trail sections, and managing existing sections, but can also be applied to any trail.

The MMM Group revised and updated the Guidelines in 2007 to reflect current information and best practices from across North America and internationally. The 2007 update contains an expanded section covering options and guidelines for on-road sections of Trail, as much of the Trail currently follows on-road routes. Two new appendices provide a manual for implementing a trail signage audit—an excellent tool to identify signage deficiencies, and an overview on the state of the Waterfront Trail based on research gained through the 2006 Trail Managers End to End Tour of the Trail.

The Guidelines include helpful advice on how to:
Plan for the differing needs of pedestrians, cyclists, in-line skaters and people with disabilities;
Identify appropriate widths, surfaces and grades for off-road and on-road trails;
Minimize the potential impact of trails on wildlife and habitat;
Choose signs that help trail users to find their way easily and safely; and
Manage maintenance tasks so that everyone gets maximum enjoyment out of the trail
Community groups, trail clubs, municipal and parks staff, landscape designers and others will all find these Guidelines indispensable both for managing existing trails and for building new ones.

Includes:
- Helpful figures; and
- Bibliography


Design, Signage and Maintenance Guidelines: Waterfront Trail, 2007


Acknowledgements -Table of Contents- Overview (573 KB)

Chapter 1 - Design Guidelines (2760 KB)

Chapter 2 - Signage Guidelines (1580 KB)

Chapter 3 - Maintenance Guidelines (205 KB)

Chapter 4 - Risk Management and Liability Issues (139 KB)

Appendix: A: Graphic Standards for the Lake Ontario Waterfront Trail (1180 KB)
Appendix: B: Definitions (129 KB)

Appendix C and D: Letter Visibility - Speed Chart and Distance Chart (119 KB)
Appendix E and F: Top Dislikes of Utilitarian Walkers - Concerns of Utilitarian Cyclists (122 KB)
Appendix G: Open Space Maintenance (1090 KB)
Appendix H: Road-Related Maintenance (274 KB)
Appendix I: Codes of Ethics (247 KB)
Appendix J: Trail Patrollers' Maintenance Log Book - Standard Forms (208 KB)
Appendix K: Guidelines for Establishing Pathway Crossings at Railways - Cover page, index to page1 (214 KB)
Appendix K: pages 2-6 (225 KB)
Appendix K: pages 7-10 (234 KB)
Appendix K: pages 11-15 (215 KB)
Appendix K: pages 16-20 (225 KB)
Appendix K: pages 21-25 (218 KB)
Appendix K: pages 26-30 (334 KB)
Appendix K: pages 31-35 (925 KB)
Appendix K: pages 36-38 (1720 KB)
Appendix K: page 39 (1780 KB)
Appendix K: pages 40-44 (1210 KB)
Appendix K: pages 45-47 (1050 KB)
Appendix K: Case Study (1600 KB)
Appendix K: Environmental Assessments (1520 KB)
Appendix K: Guidelines for Establishing Pathway Crossings at Railways - Cover page, index to page1 (214 KB)
Appendix L: Trail Manager's End to End Tour (308 KB)
Appendix M: 2006 Waterfront Trail Signage Audit (153 KB)

2002 Waterfront Trail User Survey 

Ritter, D., Rendle, N., and Coughlin, R. (2002)

2002 Waterfront Trail User Survey

During the summer of 2002, the Waterfront Regeneration Trust and the waterfront municipalities and conservation authorities set out to investigate how user perceptions about the Trail had changed from the previous user survey completed in 1996. The 2002 survey gathered data that addressed the economic, recreational, and potential tourism benefit of the Trail.

Some key findings include:
- 95% of users surveyed support a continuously linked trail from Niagara-on-the-Lake to Gananoque,
- 77% of users view the Trail as a potential vacation destination, and
- 99% of users would recommend the Trail to other people.

The results of this study will assist the Waterfront Trust and its local partners to continue to design a Waterfront Trail that delivers safe and enjoyable recreation experience and that future projects and extensions to the Trail are planned and implemented successfully.

Report includes:
- Graphic presentations of statistical results
- Bibliography


A Decade of Regeneration: Realizing a Vision for Lake Ontario's Waterfront
Barrett, S. (2000)

Ten years have passed since the release of Watershed, the interim report of the Royal Commission on the Future of Toronto's Waterfront. What have we learned from our collective experience since then? What are the lessons and tools that can guide us in the next decade?


A Decade of Regeneration is about our special relationship with Lake Ontario, and the remarkable progress that is being made by thousands of people dedicated to the Lake Ontario Greenway. The book brings attention to waterfront excellence and celebrates waterfront heritage as a reflection of buildings and culture, ideas and tradition and of the connections between people and nature.

With a myriad of examples, A Decade of Regeneration documents intitiatives large and small where trails have added measuable value, where creative partnerships and funding have resolved an apparent gridlock, and where excellence in design has elevated a typical project into a piece of art and heritage. A Decade of Regeneration sets a new direction for the next decade of regeneration to capture the momentum and renew our commitments.

Includes:
- Colour photographs of various locations along Lake Ontario’s waterfront
- Selected References and website listing

Lake Ontario Greenway Strategy 

Waterfront Regeneration Trust (1995)

A great deal of progress has been made since the Royal Commission on the Future of Toronto’s Waterfront began its work in 1988 – progress in implementing specific projects; significant improvements in provincial and municipal policies; and changing the way communities view their waterfront. The Lake Ontario Greenway Strategy reports on this progress and establishes a consensus-based blueprint for further actions. It provides a context for setting priorities, guidance on ways to achieve a shared vision and an information base to assist decision-making.

The Strategy provides an overview of background and context, a description of the key features of the waterfront of today, an analysis of the objectives and actions necessary to realize the waterfront of tomorrow, and an overview of implementation mechanisms and roles. The goal of the Strategy is to foster commitment to actions that will regenerate a healthy and sustainable waterfront that is clean, green, accessible, connected, open, usable, diverse, affordable and attractive. This goal is supported by five objectives, and a series of actions necessary to achieve each objective.

Includes:
- Colour Maps
- Photographs
- Listing of waterfront natural core areas and corridors
- Glossary and acronyms
- Bibliography and toolkit


Lake Ontario Greenway Strategy, May 1995

Cover
Credits
Table of Contents
Executive Summary
Vision

Chapter 1 - Introduction - pages 15 - 24

Chapter 2 - The Waterfront of Today - pages 25-34
Chapter 2 - pages 35-44
Chapter 2 - pages 45-54
Chapter 2 - pages 55-64
Chapter 2 - pages 65-72

Chapter 3 - The Waterfront of the Future - pages 73-79
Chapter 3 - pages 80-87
Chapter 3 - pages 88-95
Chapter 3 - pages 96-105
Chapter 3 - pages 106-113
Chapter 3 - pages 114-121
Chapter 3 - pages 122-129
Chapter 3 - pages 130-137
Chapter 3 - pages 138-144
Chapter 3 - pages 145-152
Chapter 3 - pages 153-162
Map 11 - Tourism Destination Areas

Chapter 4 - Implementation - pages 163-170
Chapter 4 - pages 171-180

Appendix A: Waterfront Natural Core Areas and Corridors
Appendix B: Participants
Appendix C: Glossary
Appendix D: Bibliography and Toolkit

Interim Report, Summer 1989 

Crombie, D. (1989)

On March 30, 1988 the federal government appointed the Honourable David Crombie to act as a one-person Royal Commission to study the future of Toronto’s waterfront in light of Toronto’s history, values, and contemporary issues. Over a period of six months the Royal Commission held a series of public hearings; more than 300 groups and individuals came forward with submissions that illustrated people’s profound interest in the future of their waterfront. The Interim Report highlights the recommendations that resulted from research studies and the public hearings. The report also examines the role and mandate of the Toronto Harbour Commissioners; the future of the Toronto Island Airport and related transportation services; the issues affecting the protection and renewal of the natural environment insofar as they relate to the federal responsibilities and jurisdiction; the issues regarding the effective management of federal lands within the Toronto waterfront area; and the possible use of federal lands, facilities, and jurisdiction to support emerging projects.

Includes:
- Bibliography

Interim Report, Summer 1989

Cover
Cover
Table of Contents

Preface - pages 1-4
Introduction - pages 5-14

Chapter 1 - The Future of the Toronto Island Airport - pages 15-24
Chapter 1 - pages 25-34
Chapter 1 - pages 35-46

Chapter 2 - The Role, Mandate, and Development Plans of Harbourfront Corporation - pages 41-57
Chapter 2 - pages 58-67
Chapter 2 - pages 68-77
Chapter 2 - pages 78-87
Chapter 2 - pages 88-98

Chapter 3 - The Role and Mandate of the Board of Toronto Harbour Commisioners - pages 99-109
Chapter 3 - pages 110-120

Chapter 4 - Environment and Health Issues - pages 121-131
Chapter 4 - pages 132-141
Chapter 4 - pages 142-151
Chapter 4 - pages 152-161
Chapter 4 - pages 162-171
Chapter 4 - pages 172-181
Chapter 4 - pages 182-191
Chapter 4 - pages 192-196

Appendix A: Deputants - pages 197-203
Appendix B: The Canadian Waterfront Resource Centre - pages 204-207

Bibliography - pages 208-219

Watershed: Interim Report 

Crombie, D. (1990)

Watershed is the second interim report of the Royal Commission on the Future of the Toronto Waterfront. It includes 80 recommendations to ensure that the future of the waterfront – from Burlington to Newcastle, from the shores of Lake Ontario to the northern reaches of the Toronto watershed – is consistent with the Commission’s principles: that the waterfront be clean, green, useable, diverse, open, accessible, connected, affordable, and attractive.

Includes:
- Index;
- Bibliography; and
- Colour photographs.

Watershed, Interim Report, August 1990

Cover

Table of Contents - pages 7-8
Preface - pagees 9-14

Chapter 1 - Ecosystem - pages 15-23
Chapter 1 - pages 24-31
Chapter 1 - pages 32-39
Chapter 1 - pages 40-47

Chapter 2 - Principles - 49-57
Chapter 2 - pages 58-65
Chapter 2 - pages 58-65
Chapter 2 - pages 74-79

Chapter 3 - Regeneration - pages 81-89
Chapter 3 - pages 90-96
Chapter 3 - pages 97-104
Chapter 3 - pages 105-111
Chapter 3 - pages 112-119
Chapter 3 - pages 120-126
Chapter 3 - pages 127-134
Chapter 3 - pages 135-137
Chapter 3 - pages 138-141
Chapter 3 - pages 142-149
Chapter 3 - pages 150-156

Map 2 - Linking the Green

Appendix A: Orders in Council
Appendix B: References
Appendix C: Comission Publications
Appendix D: Illustration Credits

Index

Restoring Natural Habitats 

Hough Woodland Naylor Dance Ltd. And Gore & Storrie Ltd. (1995)

Restoring Natural Habitats is a manual for habitat restoration in the Greater Toronto Bioregion. It provides the information you need by guiding you through five easy steps to restoring habitats. Restoring Natural Habitats details how to assess the potential and significance of your site, what species are appropriate, and how to involve your local community. Diagrams and photos explain techniques and illustrate examples of restoration in progress for the most common habitat types in the Greater Toronto Bioregion of southern Ontario.

Includes:
- Useful diagrams;
- Glossary; and
- Selected references


Restoring Natural Habitats, September 1995

Cover pages
Cover pages
Production Credits

Table of Contents - pages i - iii

Section 1 - Introduction - pages 1-8

Section 2 - Developing a Restoration Strategy - pages 9-18
Section 2 - pages 19-28
Section 2 - pages 29-38
Section 2 - pages 39-51

Section 3 - Wetlands - pages 53-62
Section 3 - pages 63-72
Section 3 - pages 73-84

Section 4 - Meadows and Grasslands - pages 85-99

Section 5 - Woodlands - pages 101-110
Section 5 - pages 111-123

Section 6 - Riparian Zones - pages 125-134
Section 6 - pages 135-141

Section 7 - Pit and Quarry Restoration - pages 143-150

Section 8 - Stormwater Management - pages 151-159

Appendix I: Selected General References
Appendix II: Common Plant Species of Marshes
Appendix III: Common Native Plan Species of Bogs
Appendix IV: Common Native Plant Species of Meadows
Appendix V: Common Non-Native Plant Species of Meadows
Appendix VI: Indicator Species for Prairies
Appendix VII: Common Woodland Species
Appendix VIII: Common Riparian Species

Glossary

Regeneration: Toronto's Waterfront and the Sustainable City 

Crombie, D. (1992)

Regeneration is the final report in which the Honorable David Crombie recommends ways to regenerate Toronto’s waterfront. The work of the Royal Commission on the Future of the Toronto Waterfront highlights the links that exist between city and nature – among people, the economy, health, and environmental sustainability. It promotes the ecosystem approach to achieve both environmental regeneration and economic recovery. It suggests new ways of doing things; round-table processes to bring agencies, the public, and business together; integration of environmental and land use planning; and partnerships to get things done.

Regeneration suggests ways to regenerate the waterfront by:
- Cleaning up the rivers and Lake Ontario;
- Establishing greenways and trails throughout the bioregion;
- Protecting and restoring habitats;
- Enhancing sense of place through historical connections, social diversity, attractive vistas, and good design;
- Stimulating the regional economy through new green infrastructure, environmentally friendly enterprise, transportation, and waterfront housing.

Includes:
- Index;
- Useful figures and color photos; and
- Bibliography

Regeneration: Toronto's Waterfront and the Sustainable City, Final Report, 1992 

Cover
Cover - pages iv - vii
Cover - pages ix - xii
Cover - pages xiii- xvi

Table of Contents - pages xvii - xviii

Preface - pages xix-xxii

Introduction - The Work of the Royal Commission on the Future of the Toronto Waterfront - page 1-9
Introduction - page 10-18

Chapter 1 - The Ecosystem Approach - pages 19-22
Chapter 1 - pages 23-26
Chapter 1 - pages 37-30
Chapter 1 - pages 31-34
Chapter 1 - pages 35-38
Chapter 1 - pages 39-40
Chapter 1 - pages 41-42
Chapter 1 - pages 43-46
Chapter 1 - pages 47-50
Chapter 1 - pages 51-54
Chapter 1 - pages 55-58
Chapter 1 - pages 59-61

Chapter 2 - Planning Practice - pages 63-68
Chapter 2 - pages 69-71
Chapter 2 - pages 72-74
Chapter 2 - pages 75-80
Chapter 2 - pages 81-86
Chapter 2 - pages 87-94
Part 2 - Environmental Imperitives - page 95

Chapter 3 - Water - pages 97-99
Chapter 3 - pages 100-102
Chapter 3 - pages 103-108
Chapter 3 - pages 109-114
Chapter 3 - pages 121-126
Chapter 3 - pages 127-129
Chapter 3 - pages 131-132
Chapter 3 - pages 133-138
Chapter 3 - pages 139-144
Chapter 3 - pages 145-148

Chapter 4 - Shoreline - pages 149-154
Chapter 4 - pages 155-160
Chapter 4 - pages 161-163
Chapter 4 - pages 164-166
Chapter 4 - pages 167-172
Chapter 4 - pages 173-176

Chapter 5 - Greenways - pages 177-181
Chapter 5 - pages 182-186
Chapter 5 - pages 187-191
Chapter 5 - pages 192-196
Chapter 5 - pages 197-201
Chapter 5 - pages 202-206

Chapter 6 - Winter Waterfront - pages 207-211
Chapter 6 - pages 212-216
Chapter 6 - pages 217-223

Healing An Urban Watershed: The Story of the Don - pages 225-230
Healing - pages 231-235
Healing - pages 236-240
Healing - pages 241-245
Healing - pages 246-250
Healing - pages 251-254
Healing - pages 255-258

Part 3 - Places - pages 261-263

Chapter 7 - Halton - pages 265-276

Chapter 8 - Mississauga - pages 277-287

Chapter 9 - Etobicoke - pages 289-302

Chapter 10 - The Central Watershed - pages 303-312
Chapter 10 - pages 313-322
Chapter 10 - pages 323-327
Chapter 10 - pages 328-332
Chapter 10 - pages 333-342
Chapter 10 - pages 343-347
Chapter 10 - pages 348-352
Chapter 10 - pages 353-362
Chapter 10 - pages 363-372
Chapter 10 - pages 373-382
Chapter 10 - pages 383-387
Chapter 10 - pages 388-390
Chapter 10 - pages 391-392
Chapter 10 - pages 393-397
Chapter 10 - pages 398-402
Chapter 10 - pages 403-408
Chapter 10 - pages 409-414

Chapter 11 - Scarborough - pages 415-425

Chapter_12_Durham_-_pages_427-431.pdf
Chapter 12 - pages 432-436
Chapter 12 - pages 437-441
Chapter 12 - pages 442-446
Chapter 12 - pages 447-453

Part 4 - Regeneration and Recovery - pages 455-457
Part 4 - pages 458-459
Part 4 - pages 460-464
Part 4 - pages 465-471

Appendix 1: Orders in Council - pages 473-481
Appendix 2: Annotated Bibliography - pages 483-488
Appendix 3: Watersheds - pages 489-493
Appendix 4: Illustration Credits - 495-504

Bibliography - pages 504-513

Index - pages 515-523
Index - pages 524-530

Signage Toolkit Working Site (Administrators Only)

 

Contact Information

(416) 943-8080
info@wrtrust.com
https://www.facebook.com/gwtadventure
https://twitter.com/WaterfrontRT
http://www.youtube.com/waterfronttrail
https://www.instagram.com/waterfront_rt/
4195 Dundas St. West - Suite 227,
Toronto, Ontario M8X 1Y4

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